College Policies - Canada

U SPORTS

U SPORTS is the national sport governing body of university sport in Canada, comprising the majority of degree-granting universities in the country. A

  1. Student-athletes may not exceed five (5) years of participation in total (including any time in either male or female U SPORTS competition) as per policy 40.10.4.3.1.1.

  2. Subject to Policy 80.80.5.4 below, student-athletes may compete on the sport team that corresponds with either their sex assigned at birth or their gender identity, provided that at all times student-athletes are in compliance with the Canadian Anti-Doping Program.

  3. Student-athletes may only compete on sport teams of one gender during a given Academic Year (as defined in 40.10.3.1.1).

DOWNLOAD: U SPORTS CANADA POLICY (2018)

Canadian Collegiate Athletic Association ​

The Canadian Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) is the national governing body for organized sports at the collegiate level in Canada.

Individual College Policies

Policies and procedures vary by institution. To view each of the listed college and university's transgender student-athlete policies, click the name of the institution. 

National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association 

Trans-Inclusive Intramural and Club Team Athletic Policies

Additionally, other colleges have written policies for inclusion in terms of restrooms and locker rooms, but handle disputes in the event of competitive/league tournament participation on a case by case basis, usually in accordance to the rules of the sport's governing body. The following schools allow athletes to participate based on their gender identity:

 

Creighton University (NE)

University of California Berkeley (CA)

University of Central Florida (FL)

University of Chicago (IL)

University of New Hampshire (NH)

Texas A&M University-Kingsville (TX)

 

College Conferences and Special Policies

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Centennial Conference

Centennial Conference (ECCC) announced on October 1, 2021 its inclusive practices for transgender and non-binary student-athletes within the conference and ensuring full support and participation for all athletes. Centennial Conference is a NCAA Division III conference.

 

LINK: Centennial Conference Student-Athlete Inclusion Policy

Eastern Collegiate Cycling Conference

Eastern Collegiate Cycling Conference (ECCC) announced on March 7, 2014 its policy for trans inclusion in cycling within the conference. ECCC is one of 11 conferences which make up USA Cycling Collegiate, and is the first to make a policy. ECCC also includes gender and perceived gender identity within its inclusivity statement.

 

LINK: ECCC policy on diversity

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North Atlantic Conference

North Atlantic Conference (NAC) policy "is based on current NCAA policy related to transgender student athlete participation and medical exceptions for the use of banned drugs. The NAC, through its governance structure, is committed to continually reviewing this information on an ongoing basis as the landscape is one of continual growth and development." NAC is a NCAA Division III conference.

 

LINK: NAC Trangender Student Athlete Participation Policy

New England Small College Athletic Conference

The New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) policy for transgender athletes is based on the NCAA policy related to transgender student-athlete participation and medical exceptions for the use of banned drugs. The policies below clarify participation of transgender student-athletes undergoing hormonal treatment for gender transition:

 

  • A trans male (FTM) student-athlete who has received a medical exception for treatment with testosterone, for purposes of NCAA and NESCAC competition may compete on a men’s team, but is no longer eligible to compete on a women’s team without changing that team status to a mixed team.

  • A trans female (MTF) student-athlete being treated with testosterone suppression medication, for the purposes of NCAA and NESCAC competition may continue to compete on a men’s team but may not compete on a women’s team without changing it to a mixed team status until completing one calendar year of testosterone suppression treatment. 
     

Any transgender student-athlete who is not taking hormone treatment related to gender transition may participate in sex-separated sports activities in accordance with his or her assigned birth gender.

 

  • A trans male (FTM) student-athlete who is not taking testosterone related to gender transition may participate on a men’s or women’s team.

  • A trans female (MTF) transgender student-athlete who is not taking hormone treatments related to gender transition may not compete on a women’s team.

 

LINK: NESCAC Transgender Student-Athlete Participation Policy

Canada

Canadian Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) policy uses hormone status as the indicator for area of play. By comparison to other policies, this policy seems restrictive for trans men who do not wish to take hormones. 

 

"A trans male (FTM) student‐athlete being treated with testosterone for diagnosed Gender Identity Disorder or gender dysphoria may compete on a men’s team, but is no longer eligible to compete on a women’s team.  A trans female (MTF) student‐athlete being treated with testosterone suppression medication for Gender Identity Disorder or gender dysphoria may continue to compete on a men’s team but may not compete on a women’s team until completing one calendar year of testosterone suppression treatment.

 

Any transgender student‐athlete who is not taking hormone treatment related to gender transition may participate in sex‐separated sports activities in accordance with his or her assigned birth gender. A trans male (FTM) student‐athlete who is not taking testosterone related to gender transition may participate on a women’s team. A trans female (MTF) transgender student‐athlete who is not taking hormone treatments related to gender transition may participate on a men’s team."

 

DOWNLOAD: Canadian Collegiate Athletic Association policy on transgender athletes